MN SWEPT

The Southwest Emergency Preparedness Team (SWEPT) is based in Southwest Minnesota.  We work together with hospitals, health services, emergency services and many other entities to enhance our response to local, regional, statewide, and national emergencies.

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Welcome the Southwest Emergency Planning Team Website

The Southwest Emergency Preparedness Team (SWEPT) is based in Southwest Minnesota. Our coalition represents 23 hospitals, 43 primary care clinics, 50 Nursing Homes, 103 EMS groups and two tribal governments in our 16-county region. Additional coalition members include: State and local representatives from Public Health, Homeland Security and Emergency Management, the Minnesota Department of Health, and the Emergency Medical Services Regulatory Board. We all work together toward enhancing our response to local, regional, statewide, and national emergencies.

In case of an emergency please contact the Regional Hospital Preparedness Coordinator (RHPC) on call by dialing 1-800-259-0195

Mission/Vision and Guiding Values

SWEPT adopted a mission/vision and guiding values on August 25, 2010.

 Vision: Attain sustainable emergency preparedness in Southwest Minnesota.

Mission: Prepare healthcare organizations to manage All-Hazard events.

Guiding Values/Principles:

1. Demonstrate integrity.

2. Maintain coalitions.

3. Promote Communication.

4. Be fiscally responsible.

5. Respect membership diversity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Meetings

SWEPT (Southwest Emergency Preparedness Team)meetings are held monthly.  For more information call the SWEPT office at 507-929-9544.

Docs Download

To access the MNSWEPT library and documents, you must be a registered user. Please use the contact form to inquire about the registration.

Tornado Season Safety

Tornadoes are nature’s most violent storms. Spawned from powerful thunderstorms, tornadoes can cause fatalities and devastate a neighborhood in seconds. A tornado appears as a rotating, funnel-shaped cloud that extends from a thunderstorm to the ground with whirling winds that can reach 300 miles per hour.

Safe places you can go:
According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, basements and interior rooms are the safest places to be during a tornado.
A good rule of thumb is to put as many walls and floors as possible between you and the tornado. Once you find a safe place, take shelter underneath a sturdy bench, table, or the stairwell. Crouch down and place your head between your knees, using your arms to cover your head.
On the other hand, the least safe place to be is in a car. If you are in a car, abandon it immediately and find a ditch to lie in. Most tornado deaths occur in cars. And never try to outrun a tornado; it may be moving faster than you think!
If you do find yourself in a tornado's path, go to the basement. If there is no basement, go to an interior room on the lowest floor, such as a bathroom or closet. If possible, cover yourself with a blanket or mattress to protect yourself from flying debris.
Remember to stay away from exterior walls or glass-enclosed places and windows. - See more at: http://www.yourradioplace.com/weather/tornado.htm#sthash.eN0wI4HK.dpuf

Docs / Support

Docs / SupportArticles found in this website can be easily saved as PDF documents. Registered users have access to the MNSWEPT library of forms and documents

MNSWEPT Coalition

Native RTL SupportMNSWEPT coalition consists of representatives from Hospitals, Clinics, Long Term Care, Public Health, Homeland Security Emergency Management, Emergency Medical Services, Minnesota Department of Health, and the Emergency Medical Services Regulatory Board. We all work together toward enhancing our response to local, regional, statewide, and national emergencies.

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